The Cartoon Picayune
8Mar/130

Spring and Summertime Updates

Perhaps you've noticed that this blog tends to be sparsely populated by new entries in the slow season between issues. For more recent posts that might not be necessarily Cartoon Picayune information but are still written by me and skew to my interests, take a look at my tumblr. I like the faster pace and more whimsical style, but I think The CP still deserves longer, more thought out posts, even if it takes a month a more.

Anyways, there's plenty of spring and summertime news to report.

The fifth issue of The Cartoon Picayune is well underway. There's a theme of Hard Work and there is plenty of it happening in production of the issue. For 2013, I'm shifting the schedule a little so that Issue 5 will be the first Summer issue. You can look forward to at least two excellent, longer stories as the main focus:

Andy Warner, who brought us "The Man Who Built Beirut" in the third issue, is back with our first advertiser-supported feature, ever! His piece examines the political fight around the legal status of sex workers in the city of San Francisco. I've been working closely with Andy on this one, and I'm very excited about it.

Emi Gennis, Editor of a Hic & Hoc  anthology about unsolved mysteries and a tremendous cartoonist herself, brings us a tragic and richly rendered tale about the so-called "Radium Girls," female factory workers in the early twentieth century poisoned by unsafe working conditions. Emi's process on this is fascinating, and she has generously explained it on her blog, in addition to creating this GIF showing the evolution of a page:

I'm happy to report that I'll once again be tabling at TCAF in Toronto, May 11 and 12, with comics wunderkind Pat Barrett. Then, in June, I'll debut Issue 5, the Hard Work issue, at CAKE in Chicago on the 15 and 16. I'll be joined at that table with Chicago's finest in comics journalism: Erin Polgreen and Joyce Rice of Symbolia and Darryl Holliday and Erik Rodriguez of The Illustrated Press (and the last two issues of The CP).

I would be remiss to not mention that you can now buy Symbolia's first Issue, "We Don't Belong" on iPad or as a PDF. Also, if you are in Chicago, you must check out The Illustrated Press exhibit at the Harold Washington Library.(I can't wait to see it!) Here also is a great interview with CP contributor Jess Ruliffson about her ongoing projects.

Finally, since this is the first year with a Summer issue, it is only fitting to be the first year with a Winter issue also. Issue 6 will be out in November. The theme is Small Worlds, and the deadline is August 1st.

More soon. If you've been paying attention, you know that I owe you one more Q+A, which I hope to post shortly.

24Oct/121

New Book Plugs

There are number of books that are new or newish that deserve your attention so I thought I'd take a sec to direct your attention to each. The first is a slim paperback from Darryl Holliday and E. N. Rodriguez called The Illustrated Press: Chicago. It's their first print publication, and a great record of their first year or so producing comics journalism. If you're mostly familiar with them from their appearances in the last two issues of The Cartoon Picayune, this is a great chance to see their work larger and in color. There is a nice crop of stories, along with text to provide context and extras. Years from now you'll be glad you bought this now and watched them both evolve as journalists and comics creators.

Next is a book that's not even done yet, but you can help it be birthed! Matt Bors is a editorial cartoonist and a comics journalist. His book will be a compendium of his hilarious cartoons as well as more serious reported work and essays. Matt is a great guy and an important figure in this tiny but rapidly emerging field. Support him by pre-ordering his book on Kickstarter and you'll be rewarded with what looks like it'll be a great book anyway.

Finally, there's a book I want to tell you about that's not actually comics journalism related, but I happen to be in it. Three years ago I did this comic, and then it ended up on Significant Objects, and now it's in a books they've released through Fantagraphics. It's an honor to be included, and it has connected me to Rob Walker among other awesome people. The book itself is a pretty great design object and a really fun collection. You can learn what the whole project is about on the site and buy the book here.

27Aug/120

Announcing Issue #4: Distress

There's a new issue of The Cartoon Picayune on its way, and it has a theme: "Distress." That's not to say that reading it will prove to be a stressful experience, in fact, I think it's going to be a great issue! Just look at that cover by E. N. Rodriguez of The Illustrated Press. Let me take you through the stories you can expect to see when this comic debuts at SPX next month:

- Matt Diffee, a bonafide New Yorker Cartoonist, has this story about his experience at a Texas rattlesnake race. It previously appeared in Texas Monthly, and it's actually funny, which is something different. But that shouldn't be a surprise since Matt's a pretty funny cartoonist.

- My story "Derecho?" will be included.

- Darryl Holliday and E. N. Rodriguez are back with their story from this month's issue of The Progressive. It's a great insight into nuns protesting the deportation of undocumented workers. Did you know that those guys are making a real book and it's almost done? You're gonna wanna buy that.

- Colin Tedford, a real stand-up New Englander and organizer of The Trees & Hills Comics Group, has a story about Morris Dancers that you are really going to have to read to believe. I don't want to ruin anything, but it's kinda incredible. Here's some video of the group Colin's piece is about.

- Finally, Brooklynite Jess Rullifson traveled with the Joe Bonham Project to Walter Reed in Bethesda, Maryland. She met 1st Lt. Michael Rhoads, a wounded marine and a fascinating person.

There you have it! It's going to be quite an issue. There is no way to pre-order, but subscribers will get their copies the soonest.