The Cartoon Picayune

The CHANCE Issue

The new issue is now on sale! The theme is Chance, and inside there are five stories around that theme. Three are by me, Josh Kramer. One is by Emma Woodbury Rand, an extremely talented young cartoonist in Chicago. The last is by Craig Schaffer, who does graphic design, illustration and infographics in Reading, PA.

I'll keep it quick: the new issue is only $4, or $5.5 with shipping. A Subscription is cheap: only $10 for two issues or $20 for four issues. Support the only English language publication devoted solely to nonfiction comics.



Spring Cartoon Picayune news

I was sad to have 2014 come and go without a new issue, but I've very happy with the new issue, which has a theme of Chance. It will be available for purchase online on Tuesday, April 21st. If you're super hungry to get it before that, this is your last chance to sign up for the email-list before the pre-sale email goes out tonight. (In the column to the right.) Subscribers also get their issues first, so consider a two or four issue subscription. Also, subscribers: let me know if you have moved!

And if you haven't already, please take a second to "like" The Cartoon Picayune on Facebook, which actually can be a big help in getting the word out.

If you're in the D.C. area, please join me for one of these upcoming events:

Launch Party Happy Hour
Boundary Road
414 H St NE
Washington, DC 20002
Tuesday, 4/21
5:00 pm - 7:00 pm

England Run Library
1201 Caroline Street
Fredericksburg, VA 22401
Saturday, 4/25
10:00 am - 5:00 pm

Also, just a note that issues 6 and 7 are now available in all digital formats in the ComiXology app for $1.99 each.


The Battle of Blair Mountain

It's been a long time since there was a new issue, but that changes next week, with the release of issue no. 7: Chance! More info soon. But if you sign up for the email list today (look to the column on the right), you'll be able to pre-order the issue this week and recieve it before anyone else. For now, here's a bonus, web-only story by Savannah Schroll Guz. You can also find her on twitter and on facebook.


Submit for the Chance issue

Update: Take until the end of this week, Oct. 17th. You still have time to send in a pitch!

Talented cartoonists and writers! This is an open call for the upcoming Chance issue of The Cartoon Picayune. Stories involving risks, near-misses or the seemingly impossible fortune are all great for our lucky number 7. I would love pitches by October 10th, so take a look at our submission guidelines and the newish submission form. Please feel free to email me with questions.

Journalism, history, literature... all sorts of great nonfiction comics are possible with this theme, so dig around, you never know what you might find.


Jackie Roche Q+A

Jackie Roche is an extremely talented cartoonist who happens to do a lot of nonfiction, often historical, comics. I was lucky enough to have a short piece of hers in the last issue of the CP, the Small Worlds Issue. She recently completed work on a project with VICE News, and I was so taken with the work that I wanted to talk to her about her part in creating it. I recommend watching the whole thing.

I think the biggest sign of how far drawn journalism has come may be the fact that there's only one comment skeptical of it on this YouTube video. For a group so quick to rip anything and everything apart, I'd say that's a win. This interview has been slightly edited for clarity.

Jackie Roche

Josh Kramer for The Cartoon Picayune: Did VICE approach you or did you reach out to them about working together? 

Jackie Roche: I was approached by Carrie Ching, producer of the "Correspondent Confidential" series for Vice. Carrie was referred to me by Erin Polgreen, cofounder of Symbolia Magazine, and the Symbolia door opened because my former SCAD classmate Emi Gennis included my thesis comic in the Unknown Origins & Untimely Ends anthology she edited for Hic & Hoc. [Emi also appears in the Hard Work issue of the CP.]

I think the complete origin story family tree above is worth mentioning because each project over the past year or so has come from a similar series of kind people, and for that I am so, so, extremely thankful.

Jackie Roche

Did you work from the audio? What was the process?

I worked directly with Carrie. She sent me the completed audio track and an illustration list with written descriptions of the requested shots and links to reference images. I also referenced the Al Jazeera America documentary, "Fault Lines: Haiti in a Time of Cholera," which is excellent.

The whole 11+ minutes are made up of your drawings. How many did you end up doing? And how long did each one take you? Run through the drawing process.

For the sake of animating parts of the video, there are two types of illustrations: full illustrations and layers. The layers are variations on a full illustration, like the coloring on a map representing the spread of disease. The video is made up of 44 illustrations and 13 layers.

The time per illustration varied, depending on how many figures are in the composition, etc. I submitted thumbnails and pencils for review before inking the illustrations with a nib and adding flat color digitally.

There was some back-and forth about the style, and we worked to find a balance between grit and clarity, and figure treatments that were not too realistic or too cartoon-y. I tried to approach illustrating in service to Walker's story and the suffering he witnessed delicately. Though the Haitians drawn in the story aren't direct likenesses of specific individuals, they represent individuals. Stiff, over-rendered art would not be compelling, and going bananas with splatters, craggy-looking figures and ominous heavy shadows everywhere would, in my opinion, undermine the tone and purpose of the narration.

Jackie Roche

How did you approach getting the visual details right? Did you have a lot of reference photos to work with?

I started with the descriptions in the illustration list to create the thumbnail sketches, and used reference materials after I had a basic composition. I used reference materials to inform the specifics in the drawings, like what the gate in front of the UN base looked like, for example, or the airport in Port-au-Prince.

I prefer to start with the thumbnails because I want to make constructive drawings rather than superficial contour drawings that rely too heavily on reference images. So for each illustration, I thought about where the camera should be for storytelling purposes. Then I drew a horizon line and quick, free-hand perspective grid. Once I had a grid, I started to add the elements requested in the illustration list. The perspective grid lets me visualize the elements in a reference photo and rotate in space to fit my composition.

Ideally, I would capture reference images myself, but that is not always possible. With a project like this where I was not able to sketch on location or take my own reference photos, constructive drawing serves two really important purposes. First, it makes storytelling the priority in each illustration. I am not at the mercy of a reference photo taken at an angle that doesn't serve the story. Second, it's less ethically murky because the drawings can be informed by, but not derivative of, the work of others.

Thanks Jackie! Don't forget to check out more of her work at her portfolio site.


…and we’re back

Hey, I know, it's been a while. This is just a tiny post to let you know that the hiatus is ending. I, Josh Kramer, will be exhibiting for The Cartoon Picayune at the Small Press eXpo next month in White Flint, but I will not have a new issue there. Instead, I'm rolling out a new theme next week and then will take submissions for that.

Oh, and you can also buy Issue #5, the Hard Work one in digital form from Comixology. Stay tuned!

Tagged as: , 2 Comments

Favorite Nonfiction Comics of 2013

The Subscriber Drive has been a big success: thanks for your help! To round things off, I thought I'd look at other people outside The Cartoon Picayune doing excellent nonfiction comics work.

On the macro level, Symbolia has put out a whole year's worth of issues, and brought some excellent work to the tablet while doing it. My favorite issue was probably the one with the theme of Heroines, which had some really beautifully drawn stories that were quite moving. This issue especially was diverse in content and every story was indeed a keeper.

Cartoon Movement is doing a little less this year but still publishing, although former editor Matt Bors has moved over to Medium and started The Nib. He's doing all sorts of stuff over there, including publishing great work like this piece by Josh Neufeld.

This was also a good year for special comics journalism issues and columns from other publications. Both inkt|art and truthout specifically featured female comics journalists.

Mainstream media also continued to publish freelance pieces of nonfiction comics in various forms. Art Hondros had this piece with the Washington Post magazine. Susie Cagle did many combinations of text and art when she was at Grist. Emi Gennis appeared in Bitch magazine. Andy Warner had more excellent explainers at Slate and elsewhere. There are many other examples.

This year there were plenty of great examples of people doing comics about their own lives but with some distance and perspective. Not necessarily journalism but not necessarily autobio either. Two favorites are this piece by Gabby Schulz and this comic by Mike Freiheit.

Predictions for next year: Higher-profile freelance pieces in national publications, new and exciting books, and new ways to post comics online that are intuitive and offer a natural reading experience.

(above art copyright Josh Neufeld)


Subscriber Drive: Reef by Adrian Pijoan

The last comic in the new issue is the featured story and is by Adrian Pijoan. He was in the first class at Tom Hart's SAW and has recently taken his passion for science and comics to the University of New Mexico. "Reef" explores the science behind the phenomenon of coral reef bleaching and the latest theories on why it might be happening. Take a look at this extended preview and I'll meet you at the bottom:

This lengthy, in-depth look into the real science of an issue that effects everyone is only possible because of the generous advertisers, donors, and subscribers to The Cartoon Picayune. To read the rest of Adrian's piece, as well as all the others featured in this Subscriber Drive, and to get the limited edition screen print, subscribe today!


Subscriber Drive: Fernando and the Furries by Bill Volk

Remember Bill Volk from Issue #2? He's back, with more tales of weird Pittsburgh. This is a great story about an fascinating community. Here's footage of the record-breaking parade. You can buy the new issue here, or start your subscription with it here, and recieve our new screen printed postcard.


Subscriber Drive: Good Hands by Jackie Roche

Today our Subscriber Drive features the first page of Jackie Roche's story in the new issue. I love her style and her enthusiasm for history and folk stories. This story, about Edwin Booth and (spoilers!) Robert Todd Lincoln, is a great example. You can buy the new issue here, or start your subscription with it here, and recieve our new screen printed postcard.